College of Forestry News

Peavy

KMTR 16 went on a recent tour of the George W. Peavy Forest Science Center, an all wood building that was manufactured using materials from our forest products industry in the Northwest.

Central Oregon Forest

The results of the study, published in the industry publication Global Change Biology earlier in November, demonstrate that the effects of drought and larger fires driven by climate change will not be spread equally across forests in the Western United States over the next three decades.

Freres

The mass plywood panels currently being used in the new George W. Peavy Forest Science Center were developed and tested with the help of OSU College of Forestry.

PNW Forest

Forests in the Pacific Northwest will be less vulnerable to drought and fire over the next three decades than those in the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada, computer modeling by researchers in Oregon State University’s College of Forestry shows.

Blacktail Deer Creek

The findings, published today in Ecohydrology, are important because they highlight the role big predators play in the health of aquatic and riparian ecosystems.

seedling

In a paper published November 1 in Science, Michael Paul Nelson and collaborators propose a coordinating body to act as a neutral third party in gene-editing decision-making.

Wild Bee

An international collaboration, led by Jim Rivers of Oregon State University, has established a roadmap for future research aimed at better understanding the role that managed conifer forests in temperate zones play for the conservation of pollinators such as bees, wasps, flies, beetles and butte

Haiti

Most reports of forest cover and deforestation in tropical nations, said study co-author Warren Cohen of the OSU College of Forestry, fail to make a distinction between primary forest – essentially, untouched original forest – and disturbed forest: that which has been selectively logged, or has r

Andrews Forest

Scientists from the College of Forestry are finding that old growth forests are a refuge for all kinds of birds...and in the face of climate change, forests like this could be more important than we ever thought.

Wetland

Forest biotechnologist Steve Strauss was interviewed with wetland ecologist Karin Kettenring on the Utah Public Radio program UnDisciplined.