OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

COF News & Events

West Coast Flies to the Rescue of East Coast Hemlock Forests

A research team led by two entomologists – Darrell Ross in the Oregon State College of Forestry and Kimberly Wallin with the University of Vermont and the USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station – demonstrated that a type of fly in the Pacific Northwest known as a silver fly (species in the genus Leucopis) attacks adelgids on western and eastern hemlocks.

The pope plays his trump card: teaching the power of moral actions

FES professor Michael Paul Nelson and Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Oregon State University Kathleen Dean Moore weigh in on Pope Francis' encyclical.

Simple Real-time Dashboards Built with Story Maps

Using the Story Map Tour storytelling template and ArcGIS Online, a simple map-based dashboard was developed to let researchers, administrators, and the general public view real-time data from 125 different sensors including webcams, stream gauges, and weather stations deployed throughout the forest. The dashboard is a really nice way to see all these data streams in their spatial context” said Mark Schulze, HJ Andrews Experimental Forest Director.

Anatomy of a Climate Tool

Melanie Brown, a natural resource management major in the College of Forestry, and OSU researcher Dominique Bachelet surveyed land managers in sagebrush country to create a blueprint for a practical, nimble, accessible computer tool for helping manage fires, protect wildlife, reseed vegetation and control invasives in a shifting landscape.

Rhinos And Other Large Herbivores At Risk Of Extinction

FES professor Bill Ripple was interviewed on NPR's Here & Now about his latest research on large herbivores.

Douglas-fir trees the hardest hit in tree die-back

Landscape and forest trees are experiencing widespread dieback this spring according to Glenn Ahrens, Oregon State University Extension Forester for Marion County. "Browning or dieback is usually caused by weather-related stress, sometimes in combination with pests and diseases," he said.

Kids feel the rush of the outdoors

Ryan Brown, Recreation and Engagement Program Manager of OSU Research Forests, said a majority of the families were attending for the first time. “It’s been a huge success,” she said. “Today has been a beautiful day in the woods. We have seen so many happy smiling faces from kids who caught their first fish and from parents taking their kids camping.”

Dave Cramsey Receives Forester of the Year Award from Oregon Society of American Foresters

Lane County Resident Dave Cramsey has received the Forester of the Year Award from the Oregon Society of American Foresters. Cramsey graduated from OSU with a BS in Forest Management in 1991.

Related Documents: 

New unmanned aircraft center should spur research, growth in evolving technology

“This further puts OSU and Oregon on the map of leaders in unmanned aircraft systems,” said Michael Wing, director of the Aerial Information System Lab at OSU. “It will help us form ties with multiple institutions and partnerships, stimulate both public and private funding, and build on some of our historic strengths in fields such as remote sensing.”

Why Does Mold Come in So Many Colors?

The amazing diversity of colors produced by molds and other fungi can vary regionally, says Sara Robinson, a researcher at Oregon State University. Blues and greens are prevalent in the Pacific Northwest, whereas oranges are more common in the Amazon. But the raison d’être of this rainbow of melanins, carotenoids, and other pigments isn’t always clear.

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