College of Forestry News

Andrews Forest

Scientists from the College of Forestry are finding that old growth forests are a refuge for all kinds of birds...and in the face of climate change, forests like this could be more important than we ever thought.

Wetland

Forest biotechnologist Steve Strauss was interviewed with wetland ecologist Karin Kettenring on the Utah Public Radio program UnDisciplined.

Fire refugia

“Those trees are lifeboats,” said Meg Krawchuk, a fire ecologist at Oregon State University. Writing recently in the journal BioScience, Dr.

Hermit Warbler

Hankyu Kim and his colleagues are developing a new experiment in the Oregon Cascades to track the movements of hermit warblers through the forest. Learning how they move could help explain how bird species are dealing with rising temperatures and climate change.

Lech

Lech Muszynski, professor in Wood Science and Engineering, holds a position until September 2019 as guest professor in building technology with specialization in cross-laminated timber (CLT) at Linnaeus University.

Firefighters

The economic consequences of fire on small communities have been borne out in several studies. Turns out, it’s complicated.

Logging

Oregon State University’s research forest near Adair Village hosted the Pacific Logging Congress' Live In-Woods Conference, the first time it’s ever been in Benton County.

Anthony Davis

Anthony S. Davis will serve as the interim dean of the Oregon State University College of Forestry effective immediately, OSU Provost and Executive Vice President Edward Feser announced.

Bee traps

A recent study led by wildlife biologist Jim Rivers, a professor in Oregon State University’s College of Forestry, indicated the removal of slash and other debris and compacting soil in recently harvested forestlands can create prime habitat for bees.

McDonald Forest

NBC16 went to OSU’s McDonald-Dunn Research Forest, where Douglas-fir trees are producing stress cones. “It’s their last ditch effort to perpetuate themselves and usually after that then they die,” OSU Professor Stephen Fitzgerald says.