College of Forestry News

Old-growth forests and managed forests with old-growth characteristics can provide relief from climate change for some bird species, research by the Oregon State University College of Forestry suggests.

The Oregon State University College of Forestry invites community members to a listening session Wednesday, Aug. 31, regarding the development of a new management plan for the McDonald and Dunn research forests owned by OSU.

Cristina Eisenberg, an Oregon State University alumna with a background in restoration ecology, wildlife biology and Traditional Ecological Knowledge, has been named the OSU College of Forestry’s first associate dean for inclusive excellence and director of tribal initiatives.

In a paper published recently in BioScience, “Rewilding the American West,” co-lead author William Ripple and 19 other authors suggest using portions of federal lands in 11 states to establish a network based on potential habitat for the gray wolf – an apex predator able to trigger powerful, wide

Founding chair of the College of Forestry Board of Visitors and OSU Business alumnus Larry Giustina, ’71, passed away on July 19.

“Climate change and the biodiversity crisis are two of the planet’s greatest threats,” said William Ripple of the OSU College of Forestry. “And it’s becoming clear that large-scale climate action won’t happen if we treat climate change as a standalone problem.”

“It is clearer than ever before that the increased utilization of wood products is critical to reducing global greenhouse emissions but only when these products are derived from sustainably managed forests,” OSU’s Rajat Panwar said.

On June 1, Chris Johns will lecture with OSU Distinguished Professor of Ecology Bill Ripple for the OSU Alumni Association’s Travel Talk webcast series. They will present on “Yellowstone Storytelling Through Art and Science,” 5:30-6:30.

“They will deliver a presentation about TEK and what the White House is doing on these efforts, followed by a public listening session that they will conduct at the summit,” said Lara Jacobs, a graduate student in forestry and co-founder and chair of Oregon State’s Traditional Ecological Knowledg

Bird species that live in wooded areas are under stress from human-caused changes to forest composition, according to new research led by Oregon State University that quantifies the effects of forest “degradation” on bird habitat.