College of Forestry News

Researchers already have the ability to remove, replace and change genes that could immediately increase productivity and improve the health of plants and animals, according to Steve Strauss, a professor and researcher at Oregon State University.

William Ripple and colleagues in the College of Forestry were part of an international collaboration that built a list of megafauna based on body size and taxonomy.

The researchers stress it’s vital to remember that upon its adoption in 1994, the Northwest Forest Plan was conceived as a century-long plan, and was not expected to show significant positive impacts on biodiversity for 50 years.

Tammy Cushing

Next year, Tammy Cushing, an Extension forest business specialist at Oregon State University, will become the third woman to serve as president of the largest professional society of foresters in the world.

The annual Starker Lecture Series at Oregon State University will this year focus on tribal forestry with a film, three lectures and a capstone field trip.

Bear and cub

“Gray wolves, brown bears and black bears are managed in most of Alaska in ways designed to significantly lower their numbers,” said study co-author William Ripple, distinguished professor of ecology in the Oregon State University College of Forestry.

Elliot forest

Anthony Davis, interim dean of the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, was interviewed on OPB's Think Out Loud about what the Elliott State Forest could bring to the college as a research forest.

Trail Runners

Oregonians’ participation in outdoor recreation activities saves the state $1.4 billion annually in health care costs, according to a report released Monday by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

GE trees

A coalition of forest scientists including Steve Strauss of Oregon State University is calling for an immediate review of international policies that the group says put unreasonable and harmful limitations on biotech research.

Fire Scars

Tree rings tell the story of what’s happening physiologically as fire suppression makes forests more dense and less tolerant of drought, pests and wildfires, new research shows.