OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

CoF Research in the News

Wildlife migration routes for multiple species can link conservation reserves at lower cost

“We demonstrate that a lot of potential gain can be made at moderate increases in cost as you try to connect habitat areas,” said Claire Montgomery, a forest economist at Oregon State and one of the researchers on the project. “Looking at trade-offs between target species is something that no one has done, as far as I know, in terms of corridor design.”

Bushmeat hunting threatens mammal populations and ecosystems, poses food security threat

An international team led by William Ripple, distinguished professor of ecology at Oregon State University, analyzed data on the IUCN Red List to reach their findings, which were published today in Royal Society Open Science, a professional journal.

How OSU’s Dr. Ripple Has Helped Rewrite the Laws on Predators

Dr. Bill Ripple made a discovery in the late 90s that shed some light on the unique roles of predators that has led to collaboration with researchers around the world. Ripple, now a Distinguished Professor and well known researcher, was just doing what comes naturally when he is curious. We call this the Ripple Effect.

Successful control of reproduction could help address concerns about use of engineered trees

Forestry scientists have found a way to arrest the development of flowers in poplar trees, paving the way for control of the unintentional spread of engineered or non-native tree species.

Swiss needle cast disease intensifies among Douglas-fir forests in Oregon Coast Range

Results from aerial analyses in 2015 indicate a slight expansion – 0.6 percent – in the affected area over 2014. However, the disease remains the most significant threat to Douglas-fir plantations in western Oregon, said David Shaw, Oregon State University forest health specialist in the College of Forestry. Shaw is director of the Swiss Needle Cast Cooperative at Oregon State, which leads efforts to understand the disease and determine how best to manage it.

Old Growth May Help Protect Northwest Forest Birds from the Impacts of Climate Change

“I expected to see a difference, but I was surprised by how big it actually was,” says Sarah Frey, a Northwest Climate Science Center graduate fellow at Oregon State University, and lead researcher on the project. “We compared old growth to other closed forest types rather than to clear-cuts, so we didn’t expect the difference to be so dramatic.” Under the supervision of her advisor, Matthew Betts, Frey logs temperature at 183 sites across the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest, a National Science Foundation Long-Term Ecological Research site on the west side of Oregon's Cascade Mountains.

Conservationists warn endangered species will vanish forever unless we act now

Ripple is William J. Ripple, an ecologist at Oregon State University who has been studying gray wolves, cougars, and other top predators for decades. Last year, he and his colleagues reviewed the status of the planet’s 31 largest carnivores—a list that includes lions, tigers, and bears, but also sea otters, dingoes, and lynxes. They found that 24 of these animals are in decline, and 17 have been confined to less than half of their original ranges. “They are some of the world’s most admired mammals and, ironically, some of the most imperilled,” the team wrote. Read more at the Huffington Post or National Geographic, or read the studies:

Prey depletion as a threat to the world’s large carnivores
Saving the world’s terrestrial megafauna

Oregon Best, Oregon State and University of Oregon announce CLT design contest winners

Oregon BEST and its collaborators at the National Center for Advanced Wood Products Manufacturing and Design today announced the winner and runner-up in its Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Design Contest that awarded $200,000 in funding and research support to fast-track the use of CLT as a new green construction material in the U.S.

The funding will support additional design, research and testing to help advance the two winning Oregon CLT projects – a parking garage in Springfield and a condominium building in northeast Portland, as well as CLT construction projects across the country. Research and testing will be conducted by the new National Center for Advanced Wood Products Manufacturing and Design, a collaboration between Oregon State University and the University of Oregon.

Microclimate predicts within-season distribution dynamics of montane forest birds

A new study published by Sarah Frey, a Forest Ecosystems and Society researcher, explores how birds in moist forests respond to climate change.

Steve Strauss featured on the Talking Biotech podcast

Talking Biotech: Oregon’s Steve Strauss on benefits, challenges to genetically engineered trees, forests biology. Dr. Steve Strauss is a Distinguished Professor of Forestry in the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society in the College of Forestry.

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