OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

CoF Research in the News

Are some wolves being ‘redomesticated’ into dogs?

Bill Ripple is co-author on a new publication out in BioScience, titled "A New Dog". To find out how gray wolves might be affected by eating more people food, Thomas Newsome, an evolutionary biologist at the Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia, and his colleagues examined studies of what’s happened to other large carnivores that live close to people.

Southern Oregon forest restoration may take precedence over spotted owl habitat

Inspiration for the study came from K. Norman Johnson, professor in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University. He discovered detailed tree inventories done between 1914 and 1924 for the part of the Fremont-Winema National Forest that was in the Klamath Reservation.

Forest recreation to be the focus of annual Starker Lecture Series

Hiking, biking, camping and other types of recreation draw thousands of outdoor enthusiasts to the woods every year. When conflicts arise, users can be at odds with each other and with the businesses and agencies responsible for managing forestland. The annual Starker Lecture Series at Oregon State University will explore this issue with presentations, discussions, forest tours and a capstone field trip.

Economics of forest biomass raise hurdles for rural development

In a model of the forest industry, researchers in the College of Forestry combined an evaluation of costs for collecting, transporting and processing biomass with the potential locations of regional processing facilities in western Oregon. Each location was chosen because it is adjacent to an existing or recently-closed wood product operation such as a sawmill or plywood manufacturing plant.

New prototype plywood panels tested at Oregon State may be world’s largest

The company announced its new panels in October, capping more than a year of development and performance testing at Oregon State’s Advanced Wood Products Laboratory. “The results look very promising,” said Ari Sinha, assistant professor in OSU’s College of Forestry, who oversaw the tests. “This is a unique product with the potential for creating jobs in rural Oregon.”

OSU receives $4 million grant to identify mechanisms for control of genetic engineering in plants

“Many crop species, and many of the valuable varieties within them, remain extremely difficult to genetically engineer,” said Steve Strauss, OSU distinguished professor in the College of Forestry and project leader. “This greatly limits the ability of this method to be used for plant breeding and scientific research. There can be blockages at any of the several steps. Regeneration of modified cells into plants is usually the most difficult to overcome.”

Storing more carbon in western Cascades forests could benefit some wildlife species, not others

“Our analysis shows that implementing forest management strategies to store additional forest carbon will influence habitat for different species, improving or expanding it for some and reducing it for others,” said Jeff Kline, lead author and an economist with the U.S. Forest Service. “Although forest managers already know that intuitively, our study helps to put some numbers on the possible outcomes of an array of management options.”

Wildlife migration routes for multiple species can link conservation reserves at lower cost

“We demonstrate that a lot of potential gain can be made at moderate increases in cost as you try to connect habitat areas,” said Claire Montgomery, a forest economist at Oregon State and one of the researchers on the project. “Looking at trade-offs between target species is something that no one has done, as far as I know, in terms of corridor design.”

Bushmeat hunting threatens mammal populations and ecosystems, poses food security threat

An international team led by William Ripple, distinguished professor of ecology at Oregon State University, analyzed data on the IUCN Red List to reach their findings, which were published today in Royal Society Open Science, a professional journal.

How OSU’s Dr. Ripple Has Helped Rewrite the Laws on Predators

Dr. Bill Ripple made a discovery in the late 90s that shed some light on the unique roles of predators that has led to collaboration with researchers around the world. Ripple, now a Distinguished Professor and well known researcher, was just doing what comes naturally when he is curious. We call this the Ripple Effect.

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