OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

CoF Research in the News

Thousands of scientists issue bleak ‘second notice’ to humanity

“Humanity has failed to make sufficient progress in generally solving these foreseen environmental challenges, and alarmingly, most of them are getting far worse,” they write. This letter, spearheaded by Oregon State University ecologist William Ripple, serves as a “second notice,” the authors say: “Soon it will be too late to shift course away from our failing trajectory.”

'Time is running out'

Lead author William J. Ripple, a distinguished professor of ecology at Oregon State University, said he was astounded by the level of support he and his seven co-authors received for their manuscript.

Human activities are reshaping forest animal communities around the world

Human activities are reshaping forest animal communities around the world. Forest-dwelling animals don’t have to live right by a road, pasture or human settlement to be affected by what scientists call forest edges. Indeed, animals up to a kilometer (0.6 miles) from an edge show a measurable impact from their proximity to areas where trees have been removed to make way for other land uses. Adam Hadley and Urs Kormann, research associate and post-doctoral scientist respectively in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, are co-authors of a paper announcing the team’s findings today in the journal Nature.

In the Game of Extinction, It’s Good to Be Average

The research, published recently in the journal PNAS, is the latest, biggest news from the world of extinction science. The scientists, including William Ripple of the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, found that in any given group of animals—from bony fishes and birds to mammals and reptiles—species at the size extremes tend to be in the most trouble.

Wood construction becomes sexy again

To explore the uses and design possibilities of mass timber, the University of Oregon architecture program is combining efforts with Oregon State University’s forestry and engineering programs to create the Tallwood Design Institute.

Deschutes Collaborative Forest Project shows targeted thinning, burns can save homes

"We really don't have the capacity in most places to do the work at anything like the scale needed," said John Bailey, an Oregon State University professor of silviculture and fire management.

OSU introduces kids to Wood Magic

Michelle Maller, who organizes the event for OSU’s Department of Wood Science and Engineering, said about 1,100 kids attended the event, which ran Tuesday to Thursday. The program dates back 17 years, Maller said.

‘Mass timber’ tour will involve legislators, building officials

Locke said legislators and others who influence policy and development also should know about the state’s TallWood Design Institute, housed at Oregon State University. The institute is a collaboration between OSU’s colleges of forestry and engineering, and architectural faculty and students at the University of Oregon’s College of Design.

Oregon State University researcher receives national award for soy-based adhesive

At a ceremony at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., Kaichang Li from the College of Forestry at Oregon State University received the 2017 Golden Goose Award from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), several other science societies and congressional supporters.

When it comes to the threat of extinction, size matters

"Knowing how animal body size correlates with the likelihood of a species being threatened provides us with a tool to assess extinction risk for the many species we know very little about," said William Ripple, a distinguished professor of ecology at Oregon State University and lead author of the study.

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