OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

CoF Research in the News

Cross-laminated timber could lead a mid-rise revolution

Flammability is “a concern very often expressed, but an easy one to dismiss,” said Lech Muszynski, associate professor of wood science and engineering at Oregon State University’s College of Forestry. Studies support the counterintuitive idea that charring produces an insulating layer that actually slows pyrolysis, making it advance predictably and sparing enough wood to pass two-hour fire-resistance tests.

Home from the Sea

The project is possible because of an increase in funding for research in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University provided by the state Legislature in 2015 with broad support from the timber industry and conservation groups. “We are investing in this project because all interests want to know the breeding habitat requirements of the marbled murrelet, so that land management decisions in our productive coastal forests benefit from the best data and science available,” said Thomas Maness, dean of the college.

Northwest forests are becoming denser and more vulnerable to fire

Those are among the results of a comprehensive analysis of forest structure and biodiversity based on satellite imagery and on-the-ground field work in the eastern Cascades of Washington, Oregon and Northern California from 1985 to 2010. Matthew Reilly, a former Ph.D. student in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University led the study, which was published in the journal Ecological Applications. 

Thousands of scientists issue bleak ‘second notice’ to humanity

“Humanity has failed to make sufficient progress in generally solving these foreseen environmental challenges, and alarmingly, most of them are getting far worse,” they write. This letter, spearheaded by Oregon State University ecologist William Ripple, serves as a “second notice,” the authors say: “Soon it will be too late to shift course away from our failing trajectory.”

'Time is running out'

Lead author William J. Ripple, a distinguished professor of ecology at Oregon State University, said he was astounded by the level of support he and his seven co-authors received for their manuscript.

Human activities are reshaping forest animal communities around the world

Human activities are reshaping forest animal communities around the world. Forest-dwelling animals don’t have to live right by a road, pasture or human settlement to be affected by what scientists call forest edges. Indeed, animals up to a kilometer (0.6 miles) from an edge show a measurable impact from their proximity to areas where trees have been removed to make way for other land uses. Adam Hadley and Urs Kormann, research associate and post-doctoral scientist respectively in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, are co-authors of a paper announcing the team’s findings today in the journal Nature.

In the Game of Extinction, It’s Good to Be Average

The research, published recently in the journal PNAS, is the latest, biggest news from the world of extinction science. The scientists, including William Ripple of the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, found that in any given group of animals—from bony fishes and birds to mammals and reptiles—species at the size extremes tend to be in the most trouble.

Wood construction becomes sexy again

To explore the uses and design possibilities of mass timber, the University of Oregon architecture program is combining efforts with Oregon State University’s forestry and engineering programs to create the Tallwood Design Institute.

Deschutes Collaborative Forest Project shows targeted thinning, burns can save homes

"We really don't have the capacity in most places to do the work at anything like the scale needed," said John Bailey, an Oregon State University professor of silviculture and fire management.

OSU introduces kids to Wood Magic

Michelle Maller, who organizes the event for OSU’s Department of Wood Science and Engineering, said about 1,100 kids attended the event, which ran Tuesday to Thursday. The program dates back 17 years, Maller said.

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