OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

COF News & Events

OSU adds trail options: Grants, volunteers expand recreation on Mac-Dunn Forest

The saddle is one of the more popular entry points to the McDonald-Dunn Research Forest, an 11,000-acre complex of wooded ridges and valleys owned by the Oregon State University College of Forestry and managed for education and research — and, increasingly, for recreation, with an estimated 145,000 or more visits per year.

With support from the state, forest industry, and conservation groups, OSU researchers gather data on threatened seabird

The project is possible because of an increase in funding for research in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University provided by the state Legislature in 2015 with broad support from the timber industry and conservation groups. “We are investing in this project because all interests want to know the breeding habitat requirements of the marbled murrelet, so that land management decisions in our productive coastal forests benefit from the best data and science available,” said Thomas Maness, dean of the college.

Conserve intact forest landscapes to maximize biodiversity, reduce extinction risk

“We have seen declines in species in landscapes that have already lost a massive amount of habitat,” said Matthew Betts, lead author and professor in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University. “But we found much more support for what we call the initial intrusion hypothesis. It’s the initial hit caused by roads going into tropical forests and the human activities that follow that is most substantial. These are also the spots with the greatest sheer numbers of species.”

Marbled Murrelet study along the Oregon coast

The study, led by Oregon State University assistant professor and senior researcher Jim Rivers, is the first to tag marbled murrelets on the open ocean.

Large carnivores have lost more than 90 percent of their range

Chris Wolf and William Ripple at Oregon State University looked at historical accounts of large carnivores and maps of their preferred habitat around AD 1500, and found that they are now present in just a third of the land area they occupied back then. Of the 25 species analysed, all weighing more than 15 kilograms, 15 had lost more than half their range.

Seismic experiments will test performance of innovative cross-laminated timber structure

“The overarching goal of the project is to propose a design methodology for seismic loading for large panels subjected to large in-plane loading, including some consisting of a composite made of concrete and cross-laminated timber (CLT),” said Arijit Sinha, associate professor of renewable materials in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University

In Springfield, mayor’s innovation, persistence leads timber town into future

“Mayor Lundberg is doing something important for the pride of the community,” said Lech Muszynski, associate professor at Oregon State University. “She’s demonstrating the capacity of this technology. If it can work for this challenging open parking structure, it can work for just about anything else.”

The 10 best U.S. colleges for studying natural resources and conservation

OSU is named one of the 10 best U.S. colleges for studying natural resources and conservation by USA Today!

BioBlitz at Avery Park

Luciana Leite, a doctoral student in the College of Forestry and the event’s organizer, said the event had sponsorship from Forest Biodiversity Research Network at OSU and the Student Sustainability Coalition, but the organizers were mostly a group of friends who wanted to promote citizen science.

Wolves need space to roam to control expanding coyote populations

"It will be interesting to see the influence of large predators on smaller predators in other parts of the world, especially the role of the big cats such as jaguars, leopards, lions and tigers," said co-author William Ripple of Oregon State University.

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