College of Forestry News

Oregon State University is putting CLT and other timber products to the test in its newest rendition of Peavy Hall, center of the university’s College of Forestry, which is under construction now.

Bill Ripple, a distinguished professor of ecology at Oregon State University, has spent a large part of his career studying the interplay between predators, prey and plant life in and around Yellowstone National Park.

Cameron Salvitelli, a senior studying wood science keeps himself busy by working as part of the Student Logging Training Program (SLTP) and playing the drums for Oregon State’s marching and pep bands.

‘The Douglas fir is incredibly important.,’ says David Shaw, associate professor at Oregon State University and Extension Forest Health specialist.

Last year the Oregon Heritage Tree Committee honored Paul Ries with it highest distinction, the Maynard C. Drawson Memorial Award.

The new veneer-based product — called “mass plywood panels” — could change the construction and timber industry, said Arijit Sinha, an associate professor in Oregon State University’s College of Forestry, which played a critical role in the development and testing of the panels, called MPPs.

Ancient forests tend to provide moderate temperatures compared with their surroundings, potentially buffering some of the sharpest impacts of climate change, said Matthew Betts, a professor at Oregon State University.

“In Coast Range and Western Cascades catchments, where our study streams were located, streams that are small and non-fish bearing have no regulatory requirement for an overstory riparian buffer,” said Kevin Bladon, lead author and assistant professor in the College of Forestry at Oregon State Un

“Imagine the difference between the temperature of the sand and the air at the beach on a hot, summer day,” said David Mildrexler, the lead author who received his Ph.D. from the College of Forestry at Oregon State last June.

“They effectively roost at sea at night,” says Jim Rivers, a professor at OSU and one of the project leads. So far, the teams have caught 17 murrelets. Nelson and Rivers hope for at least 30—their permit allows up to 100—but they will take whatever they can get.