OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

COF News & Events

Mac-Dunn logging raises concerns

Stephen Fitzgerald, director of the research forests, said he knows the salvage operation can come as a visual jolt. “When you see all that, it looks like a lot of logging — and it is,” he acknowledged. “I understand how people who aren’t used to that can react to it.”

Oregon firm first in US to be certified for new wood product

The governor also announced the launch of a $200,000 CLT design competition co-sponsored by Oregon BEST and a new collaboration between Oregon State University and University of Oregon called the "National Center for Advanced Wood Products Manufacturing and Design."

Global water analysis re-thinks key part of the hydrologic cycle

Researchers have discovered that the notion of a well-mixed pool in the ground is wrong. In fact, they report in a letter in this week’s edition of the journal Nature, water in plants comes from a compartment in the soil that is separate and disconnected from water that flows elsewhere. “This is a new interpretation of the hydrologic cycle,” said Jeff McDonnell, co-author and a courtesy professor in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University.

From Smokey Bear to climate change: the future of wildland fire management

Associate Professor of Silviculture and Fire Management John Bailey on the future of wildland fire management.

Genetically modified trees are being 'strangled' by red tape

"With global climate change and the spreading of pests, it's rather urgent we have all the tools we can bring to bear," lead author Dr Steven Strauss from the Oregon State University told BBC News.

Grizzly bears are helped by wolves

Wild fruit is an important part of grizzly bear diets, especially when they are trying to gain weight before winter hibernation stated study co-author William Ripple, a forest ecosystems researcher at Oregon State University.

Forest ranger Bob Brant keeps a close watch over Marys Peak

After earning a degree in forestry from Oregon State University, he went to work for the Siuslaw National Forest in 2011. With his aviator glasses, flowing white beard and unflappable demeanor, “Ranger Bob” has become a familiar presence on Marys Peak, which he patrols five days a week from the cab of his white Chevy Silverado pickup.

South Korean students visit OSU

Extension Specialist Paul Ries showed a group of students from South Korea around the urban forests of Corvallis this week. OSU’s College of Forestry and Agriculture are partnered with INTO OSU to provide a program for Kyungpook National University in South Korea. This first-of-its-kind program brings a cohort of ten Korean college students, majoring in diverse Agriculture and Forestry related fields, to Oregon to experience university life and learning at OSU.

Rising fossil fuel energy costs spell trouble for global food security

“It is mostly a race between the capacity of microbe populations to grow on human foodstuffs and evolve adaptations to changing conditions and the capacity of humans to come up with new technologies for preserving, storing, and transporting food,” wrote lead author Sean T. Hammond, a postdoctoral researcher and interdisciplinary ecologist in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University.

Insect-killed forests pose no additional likelihood of wildfire

An analysis of wildfire extent in Oregon and Washington over the past 30 years shows very little difference in the likelihood of fires in forests with and without insect damage. Indeed, other factors – drought, storms, and fuel accumulation from years of fire suppression – may be more important than insects in determining if fire is more or less likely from year to year.

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