College of Forestry News

“They effectively roost at sea at night,” says Jim Rivers, a professor at OSU and one of the project leads. So far, the teams have caught 17 murrelets. Nelson and Rivers hope for at least 30—their permit allows up to 100—but they will take whatever they can get.

The forests around this research site south of Roseburg, Oregon, are slowly coming back from the 50-thousand acre Douglas Complex Fire that burned in 2013. But in the meantime, OSU researcher Sara Galbraith has turned those blackened forests into a massive laboratory.

A team led by Matthew Betts, professor in the College of Forestry, reached their conclusions by analyzing data for bird populations, forest structure and climate across northwestern North America.

Researcher Seri Robinson has come across a fungal pigment that could be an excellent way to create a new generation of sustainable wood dyes and protectants.

In 1985, Barte and his brother, Bond, established the Starker Lecture Series in forestry at Oregon State University. Both have been recognized for their service to their alma mater, jointly winning the College of Forestry’s Distinguished Alumni Award in 2002 and the OSU Foundation’s E.B.

“People have deeply rooted values that are affected by fires,” said Chad Kooistra, who led the analysis as a Ph.D. student in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University. “Wildfires are a very salient issue, even months or years after a fire.

A new paper published in a recent issue of the journal Ecological Applications by Matthew Reilly, while he was a scientist at Oregon State University, says the best way to avoid catastrophic fires may be to allow low- and moderate-severity fires to just burn.

The results of a limited entry system at Obsidian Trail and Pamelia Lake have been positive, said Troy Hall, an Oregon State University professor who has tracked environmental conditions at Obsidian. “I’ve actually been surprised,” Hall said.

Oregon State University College of Forestry is constructing its new headquarters entirely out of engineered wood products. It will the first in the U.S. to use a “rocking wall” seismic design so it can survive a major earthquake.

“This and a number of other studies provide some very nice evidence that current best management practices are proving to be much more effective than historical practices,” said Jeff Hatten, lead author and associate professor in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University.