College of Forestry News

The annual Starker Lectures at Oregon State University will explore the future of forestry and how land managers, policy makers and communities ought to prepare for decisions that could shape generations.

glacier

The lead author of the warning letter and new response paper, ecology Professor William Ripple, from Oregon State University, said: “Our scientists’ warning to humanity has clearly struck a chord with both the global scientific community and the public.”

Lebanon Reforestation Initiative

The associate dean for research and international programs came to OSU in 2016 and is one of the drivers of the College of Forestry’s leadership role in reforestation efforts around the globe – from the Caribbean to Africa, from the Middle East to South America.

Wildfire scientists, land managers and policy leaders from across the West will convene in Portland on March 1-2 to consider steps to reduce the impacts of catastrophic fire in Western states, and a limited number of seats are available to the public on March 2.

A paper published last December by an Oregon State University scientist became one of the mostly widely shared science papers since 2011, according to the science communications company Altmetric, and has inspired private contributions to support further research.

“From a regional perspective, the differences in projected future changes are minor when you look at how much each projection says climate will change for the business-as-usual scenario,” said Yueyang Jiang, lead author and a postdoctoral scientist at OSU.

“Scientists saw that and thought, What the hell is this?” said Steve Strauss, a forest biotechnology professor at Oregon State University.

To reach their conclusions, a team led by Urs Kormann, a post-doctoral scientist in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, surveyed bird communities in 49 forest fragments near the Las Cruces Biological Station in Costa Rica.

Oregon State University is putting CLT and other timber products to the test in its newest rendition of Peavy Hall, center of the university’s College of Forestry, which is under construction now.

Bill Ripple, a distinguished professor of ecology at Oregon State University, has spent a large part of his career studying the interplay between predators, prey and plant life in and around Yellowstone National Park.