College of Forestry News

Cecil the Lion

“It’s almost like an ethical distraction, calling it by some other name,” said co-author Michael Paul Nelson, a professor and the Ruth H. Spaniol Chair of Renewable Resources at OSU. “We have these metaphors that we hide behind.

Murrelet Chick

With funding from the state Legislature, forest ecologists and ornithologists at Oregon State are conducting a long-term, large-scale study to determine what the marbled murrelet needs to survive.

Douglas Complex fire

“We leveraged a fire severity metric that integrates fire intensity and tree susceptibility. We demonstrated how industrial forest management increases these aspects of fire risk,” said Harold Zald, lead author and a former post-doctoral scientist at Oregon State.

Start 'em young

The renewable materials program provides four tracks from which to choose: science and engineering; marketing and management; art and design; and advanced wood manufacturing.

Earth's mammals

But something about substantial animals makes them more vulnerable to population collapse, said William Ripple, director of the Global Trophic Cascades Program at Oregon State University. For starters, there are usually fewer of the big animals, at least compared with the little guys.

Animal images

“I was surprised to see that although these 10 animals are the most charismatic, a major threat faced by nearly all of them is direct killing by humans, especially from hunting and snaring,” said William Ripple, a distinguished professor of forest ecology at Oregon State University and a co-autho

Juniper testing

Oregon State University scientists have concluded an exhaustive series of tests on western juniper lumber and opened the door to commercial wood markets for an invasive tree that has spread widely across central and eastern Oregon and other parts of the Great Basin.

annual river flow

“That suggests smaller, prescribed burns can be a management tool for potentially decreasing the threat of bigger fires and creating more resilient forests without having a major effect on water yields,” said co-corresponding author Kevin Bladon of Oregon State University.

wolf

“We’re just uncovering these effects of large carnivores at the same time their populations are declining and are at risk,” said William Ripple, an ecologist at Oregon State University.

The annual Starker Lectures at Oregon State University will explore the future of forestry and how land managers, policy makers and communities ought to prepare for decisions that could shape generations.