College of Forestry News

Logging

Oregon State University’s research forest near Adair Village hosted the Pacific Logging Congress' Live In-Woods Conference, the first time it’s ever been in Benton County.

Anthony Davis

Anthony S. Davis will serve as the interim dean of the Oregon State University College of Forestry effective immediately, OSU Provost and Executive Vice President Edward Feser announced.

Bee traps

A recent study led by wildlife biologist Jim Rivers, a professor in Oregon State University’s College of Forestry, indicated the removal of slash and other debris and compacting soil in recently harvested forestlands can create prime habitat for bees.

McDonald Forest

NBC16 went to OSU’s McDonald-Dunn Research Forest, where Douglas-fir trees are producing stress cones. “It’s their last ditch effort to perpetuate themselves and usually after that then they die,” OSU Professor Stephen Fitzgerald says.

Yellowstone Wolf

This is the first large-scale study to show that aspen is recovering in areas around the park, as well as inside the park boundary, said Luke Painter, a wildlife ecologist at Oregon State University and lead author on the study. Wolves were reintroduced to the park in 1995.

Poplar plantation

Steve Strauss, a distinguished professor of biotechnology at OSU, joins OPB's Think Out Loud to discuss a recent field study that demonstrated trees can be genetically engineered to prevent new seedlings from establishing.

Brazilian Tree

“If a company receives permits to extract and transport more timber than exists on the property covered by the permits, wood harvested illegally from other areas can be sold as if it came from the permitted property,” said study co-author Mark Schulze, faculty member in OSU’s College of Forestry

Wild Bee

A recent study from Oregon State University suggests that removing timber harvest residue — also known as “slash” — could help wild bee populations thrive in the wake of a clearcut logging operation.

Border Wall

A continuous wall on the border between the United States and Mexico would harm a multitude of animal species by fragmenting their geographic ranges, Oregon State University distinguished professor of ecology William Ripple has concluded, supported by thousands of other scientists around the glob